FUN FACTS ABOUT MONEY

Heard any crazy coin trivia lately? We’ve collected some interesting and surprising facts about money.

From the ancient world of first coins ever, to the newest Guinness world record (and a few fun loops thrown in between),
impress your friends and family with your collection of numismatic knowledge.

CATTLE IS PROBABLY THE OLDEST OF
ALL FORMS OF CURRENCY

Cattle as money dates back to 9000 B.C. Some cattle were still used as money in parts of Africa in the middle of the 20th century. Due to their practical value, cattle and other livestock were common resources for bartering, and later, the early formation of the standard pricing concept.

PAPER MONEY & COINS

The earliest recorded use of paper money can be traced back to the Song dynasty (960-1279) in China.

The earliest coins recorded were made during the reign of King Gyges of Lydia, Turkey, c. 630 BC and consisted of electrum, a naturally occurring combination of gold and silver.

PLAYING CARDS WERE
USED AS MONEY

Due to a shortage of currency in 1685, playing cards signed by the governor of New France passed as a form of currency (also referred to as “card money”), which could later be redeemed for silver coins. This is considered the first paper money in North America.



Largest Collection of Uncut
Bank Notes

belongs to Leigh Follestad (Canada) and consists of 212 sheets from 51 different countries, representing 124 denominations as of 10 July 2013, in Penticton, British Columbia, Canada.

Largest Hoard of Coins Found

80,000 aurei in Brescello near Modena, Italy in 1814, believed to have been deposited c. 37BC.

Largest Chocolate Coin

weighs 658 kg (1,450 lb 10 oz) and was presented at the Cioccoshow Exhibition during an event organised by the BF Servizi SRL (Italy), in Bologna, Italy, to celebrate Guinness World Records Day, on 15 November 2012.

Longest Coin Spin

25.71 seconds, achieved by Keita Hashimoto (Japan), in Tochigi, Japan, on 17 July 2014.




UNSOLVED MYSTERY...


The original design for the loonie was of the voyageurs, the explorers in Canada but somehow, the mold was lost between Ottawa and Winnipeg and never recovered. Where is it? Did it fall off a truck? Nobody knows and so to prevent counterfeit money, we changed the design to the loonie.

A POPPY SPY DEVICE?
In 2007, when American defence contractors first saw Canada’s 2004 coloured poppy quarter, they thought it was a spy coin! The US government examined the coin's security features and incorrectly concluded that the protective coating was being used to hide a surveillance device!

GOT AN EXTRA MILLION DOLLARS?
The most expensive Canadian coin ever sold was in 2003, when a 1911 Canadian silver dollar was auctioned for $1 million!

LOONIES & TOONIES EVERYWHERE
On March 28, 2012, a Brinks security truck crashed near Ranmore, Ontario, sending roughly $3 million in loonies and toonies scattered across the highway. Authorities used industrial strength magnets to pick up the precious cargo.