Home > Canadian Mint Products > Theme > Canada's Military ▾ > War of 1812 >

2013 $250 Battle of Chateauguay - Pure Silver Kilo Coin
$250 2013 Silver Coin - Battle of Chateauguay
 
Alternative Views:


Our Price: $2,249.95 ** Tax Exempt **
Year: 2013

RCM# 125168

Stock Status:(out of stock)

Availability: Usually Ships in 2 to 3 Weeks
Product Code: 623932047570

Description Technical Specs Extended Information
 
Royal Canadian Mint engravers faithfully reproduced the illustration Bataille de Chateauguay (Battle of Chateauguay) by celebrated Canadian artist Henri Julien as the reverse image of this coin. Julien (1852-1908) worked as a lithographer, illustrator, caricaturist, painter and journalist. He is renowned for his depictions of daily habitant life and for the speed and accuracy of his work, such as this coin’s compelling portrayal of de Salaberry rallying his diverse and united troops behind the abattis at the start of the battle.

The Battle of Châteauguay: October 26, 1813
Throughout the War of 1812 in Canada, most of the military action took place in Upper Canada, the area surrounding the Great Lakes (present-day Ontario) and extending east into Lower Canada (present-day Quebec). After a year of fighting, the Americans still had not achieved victory and set their sights on Montréal and Kingston. By capturing (either of) these strongholds, the Americans would control Britain’s key supply route on the St. Lawrence River and win the war. To that end, they planned a two-pronged invasion—General Hampton would take Montréal, and General Wilkinson would advance to Kingston.

By October 23, 1813, nearly 3,000 American soldiers under General Hampton were setting up camp on the north shore of the Châteauguay River, downstream from the forces led by Lieutenant Colonel de Salaberry.

De Salaberry was ready and waiting. Charged with defending the Châteauguay, he had already thwarted numerous attempts to invade Montréal, even attacking Hampton’s forces the previous month in a pre-emptive strike. As de Salaberry retreated north, he blocked the route with a network of felled trees and sharpened their branches to points. Behind this imposing abattis, de Salaberry built four additional defence lines that took full advantage of the area’s difficult terrain. What’s more, another company under the command of Captain Brugière was strategically positioned directly opposite on the river’s south shore.

On October 26, as Hampton’s troops began to clash with de Salaberry’s lead party at 10:00 a.m., another 300 soldiers took up their positions immediately behind the abattis with 1,500 more men waiting in reserve in the trenches of the four defence lines. Among them, Canadian Fencibles, two companies of Voltigeurs, a party of 22 First Nations allies and a company from the 2nd Battalion Sedentary Militia of Beauharnois.
The firing quickly became so intense that some members of the lead party retreated behind the abattis. Seeing this, the Americans began to yell “victory.”

Not wanting the Americans to discover their numerical superiority, de Salaberry quickly ordered his men to begin shouting and to sound an advance on their bugles. His ruse worked, and de Salaberry capitalized on the temporary lull to send reinforcements to the south shore where Brugière’s men were fighting with two American companies attempting to circle around and attack from behind. When two of their Captains were severely wounded during a direct bayonet charge, the Canadians withdrew.

Once again, the Americans believed they were winning, but as they burst onto the riverbank to pursue Brugière’s troops, they found themselves face-to-face with the Canadians on the north bank. De Salaberry’s men immediately opened fire and sent the Americans retreating into the woods. It was 3:00 p.m. Only a few hours had passed. Still, de Salaberry waited for a second attack which never came. It was the last time Montréal would face a serious invasion—a devastating defeat for the Americans that directed the final chapter in the War of 1812.
Features
Produced By: RCM
Denomination: 250 Dollar

Be the first to review this product!»